We all have someone who truly loves us and we reciprocate the same feeling for him. If that someone happens to be an animal or a pet this bonding becomes all the more special. This feeling is too intimate and beautiful to be given away easily. These animals become an integral part of our lives and we dread a moment without them.
Remember to love a animal doesn't necessary mean adopting them, a simple gesture of giving food to a street dog or feeding milk to cat, shows your love for other beings.

Share Your Love For Animals With The World - this is the theme of this blog and all animal lovers are requested to share their feeling with us and others. You can send a picture of your pet/loved animal with an article just fill the form below . Your entries along with your feeling will be shared and appreciated by the world.

Monday, March 7, 2011

Red-Eyed Tree Frog (Agalychnis callidryas)

Red-Eyed Tree Frog (Agalychnis callidryas)
The Red-eyed Treefrog (Agalychnis callidryas) is an arboreal hylid native to Neotropical rainforests in Central America.

Many scientists believe the red-eyed tree frog developed its vivid scarlet peepers to shock predators into at least briefly questioning their meal choice.

These iconic rain-forest amphibians sleep by day stuck to leaf-bottoms with their eyes closed and body markings covered. When disturbed, they flash their bulging red eyes and reveal their huge, webbed orange feet and bright blue-and-yellow flanks. This technique, called startle coloration, may give a bird or snake pause, offering a precious instant for the frog to spring to safety.
red eyed tree frog, red-eye tree frog
Their neon-green bodies may play a similar role in thwarting predators. Many of the animals that eat red-eyed tree frogs are nocturnal hunters that use keen eyesight to find prey. The shocking colors of this frog may over-stimulate a predator's eyes, creating a confusing ghost image that remains behind as the frog jumps away.

Red-eyed tree frogs, despite their conspicuous coloration, are not venomous. They are found in tropical lowlands from southern Mexico, throughout Central America, and in northern South America. Nocturnal carnivores, they hide in the rain forest canopy and ambush crickets, flies, and moths with their long, sticky tongues.

Red-eyed tree frogs are not endangered. But their habitat is shrinking at an alarming rate, and their highly recognizable image is often used to promote the cause of saving the world's rain forests.

Red-Eye Tree Frog (Agalychnis callidryas)

Red-eyed tree frogs, as their name states, have red eyes with vertically narrowed noses, a vibrant green body with yellow and blue striped sides, and orange toes. There is a great deal of regional variation in flank and thigh coloration . Although it has been suggested that A. callidryas' bright colors function as aposematic or sexual signals, neither of these hypotheses have been confirmed . Males range from 2 (5.08 centimetres) to 2½ inches (6.35 centimetres), while female range from 2½ (6.35 centimetres) to 3 inches (7.62 centimetres) on average. Young frogs are typically brown in color and turn greener as they mature, although adult frogs can change their color slightly depending on mood and environment. Red-eyed tree frogs have soft, fragile skin on their belly, and the skin on their back is thicker and rougher.
The red-eyed tree frog has three eyelids and sticky pads on its toes. Phyllomedusid tree frogs are arboreal animals, meaning they spend a majority of their life in trees, which also makes them great jumpers.

sitting full image pic of red eyed tree frog

Red-eyed tree frogs are not poisonous and rely on camouflage to protect themselves. During the day, they remain motionless, cover their blue sides with their back legs, tuck their bright feet under their belly, and shut their red eyes. Thus, they appear almost completely green, and well hidden among the foliage.

Red-Eyed Tree Frog (Agalychnis callidryas)

Peacock : The most beautiful bird
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